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How to Develop Thought Leadership Insights 4: Mash Up Your Expertise [VIDEO]

Mash-up-your-expertise

This video is the fourth in a five-part series about how to develop thought leadership insights. This video talks about mashing up your expertise.

Video Transcription

Hi, I’m Lee Frederiksen. Today I want to continue on our series about how to develop thought leadership insights. This is about how can you get those types of insightful perspectives that really make you a thought leader.

Now, previously, we’ve talked about some other strategies. First, narrowing your focus. The second one, doing some original research that hasn’t been done before. The third one is kind of taking a contrarian or opposite view of things. So, kind of do your analysis and see if there’s some insights.

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Today we want to focus on the fourth strategy, that is what we call, mashing up your expertise. And what we mean by that is simply, look outside your individual specialty area. You’ve narrowed your specialty area but look outside, look at a different discipline. If you’re an accountant, try to see this from a strategist point of view. If you are an attorney, try to see it from an accountant’s point of view.

In other words take a completely different disciple, a different expertise and try to apply that to the issues that you’re focused on. And I think that what you’ll find out is that sometimes a new perspective, new models, new ways of thinking of something can really open up your insights that can propel you to a thought leadership position.

Watch Earlier Posts in This Series:

1: Narrow Your Focus

2: Do Original Research

3. Take a Contrarian Perspective

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Lee Frederiksen, Ph.D. Who wears the boots in our office? That would be Lee, our managing partner, who suits up in a pair of cowboy boots every day and drives strategy and research for our clients. With a Ph.D. in behavioral psychology, Lee is a former researcher and tenured professor at Virginia Tech, where he became a national authority on organizational behavior management and marketing. He left academia to start up and run three high-growth companies, including an $80 million runaway success story.

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