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Infographic: How Head Games Can Ruin Your Brand Strategy

Building your brand strategy on a flawed view of the marketplace is a really bad idea. Ditto for a brand strategy based on an inaccurate view of how the marketplace sees your firm.

But this is exactly what happens to many firms. Why? They just don’t believe that their perceptions are flawed. They are stuck in a bad head game.

Don’t believe it? Just take a look at the brand new infographic “Head Games” below. It’s based on data from our just released book Inside the Buyer's Brain, which explores how professional services buyers and sellers live in different worlds.

Using retro 8 bit graphics, the Head Games infographic tells a compelling story of how the two “worlds” collide. And when marketplace reality meets a flawed brand strategy, your firm is the real loser.

 

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Brand Strategy Blunders

You’ll learn how Sellers tend to underestimate the importance of key business problems that their clients are facing. This makes it hard to align your brand strategy to client priorities.

Even more concerning is the gap between Buyers and Sellers perception of the relevance of your firm’s services to solving the client’s key business issues. Yikes!

And then there is the issue of competitors. The Buyers and Sellers lists of your competitors only have a 25% overlap. Double Yikes!

You’ll also see how Sellers undervalue the importance of their reputation and overvalue the role that price plays in the Buyers' brain.

While the tone of the Head Games infographic is fun, the message is serious. Don’t let your own “head games” ruin your brand strategy.

Enjoy!

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Lee Frederiksen, Ph.D. Who wears the boots in our office? That would be Lee, our managing partner, who suits up in a pair of cowboy boots every day and drives strategy and research for our clients. With a Ph.D. in behavioral psychology, Lee is a former researcher and tenured professor at Virginia Tech, where he became a national authority on organizational behavior management and marketing. He left academia to start up and run three high-growth companies, including an $80 million runaway success story.

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